The Emu

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The emu is the second-largest living bird by height, after its ratite relative, the ostrich. It is endemic to Australia where it is the largest native bird and the only extant member of the genus Dromaius. The emu’s range covers most of mainland Australia, but the Tasmanian emu and King Island emu subspecies became extinct after the European settlement of Australia in 1788. The bird is sufficiently common for it to be rated as a least-concern species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

The Koala

The koala (Phascolarctos cinereus, or, inaccurately, koala bear[a]) is an arboreal herbivorous marsupial native to Australia. It is the only extant representative of the family Phascolarctidae and its closest living relatives are the wombats. The koala is found in coastal areas of the mainland’s eastern and southern regions, inhabiting Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, and South Australia. It is easily recognisable by its stout, tailless body and large head with round, fluffy ears and large, spoon-shaped nose. The koala has a body length of 60–85 cm (24–33 in) and weighs 4–15 kg (9–33 lb). Pelage colour ranges from silver grey to chocolate brown. Koalas from the northern populations are typically smaller and lighter in colour than their counterparts further south. These populations possibly are separate subspecies, but this is disputed.
Koalas typically inhabit open eucalypt woodlands, and the leaves of these trees make up most of their diet. Because this eucalypt diet has limited nutritional and caloric content, koalas are largely sedentary and sleep up to 20 hours a day. They are asocial animals, and bonding exists only between mothers and dependent offspring. Adult males communicate with loud bellows that intimidate rivals and attract mates. Males mark their presence with secretions from scent glands located on their chests. Being marsupials, koalas give birth to underdeveloped young that crawl into their mothers’ pouches, where they stay for the first six to seven months of their lives. These young koalas, known as joeys, are fully weaned around a year old. Koalas have few natural predators and parasites, but are threatened by various pathogens, such as Chlamydiaceae bacteria and the koala retrovirus, as well as by bushfires and droughtsDSCN1070DSCN1080DSCN1088DSCN1098DSCN1079DSCN1094DSCN1091

These photos were taken at a wild life sanctuary, in Perth Western Australia.

Watching The World Go By.

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This is my next door neighbours dog “MANA” he is a beautiful white boxer, with lovely blue eyes.  He loves to lie down and just watch the world go by from under the garage door.

 

Charlie

“CHARLIE” was found in a cardboard box with his sister Loala, at the end of a street. Dumped, not wanted. They were about 6 weeks old. They were both taken in by a loving family, given food, shelter & lots of love. He was hit by a car at about 18 months old and had to have major surgery to fix a broken pelvis, he survived & grew strong. He is now 4 years old & an incredible boy, loving with an immense personality.

Unfortunately so many kittens ( & puppies) are dumped, disposed of in numerous ways or killed unnecessarily, it breaks my heart. If only the human race would take more responsibly & have more compassion for everything other than themselves.

We then may live in a better world.dscn8827fscn8842fscn8844fscn8837fscn8843