The Emu

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The emu is the second-largest living bird by height, after its ratite relative, the ostrich. It is endemic to Australia where it is the largest native bird and the only extant member of the genus Dromaius. The emu’s range covers most of mainland Australia, but the Tasmanian emu and King Island emu subspecies became extinct after the European settlement of Australia in 1788. The bird is sufficiently common for it to be rated as a least-concern species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

The Koala

The koala (Phascolarctos cinereus, or, inaccurately, koala bear[a]) is an arboreal herbivorous marsupial native to Australia. It is the only extant representative of the family Phascolarctidae and its closest living relatives are the wombats. The koala is found in coastal areas of the mainland’s eastern and southern regions, inhabiting Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, and South Australia. It is easily recognisable by its stout, tailless body and large head with round, fluffy ears and large, spoon-shaped nose. The koala has a body length of 60–85 cm (24–33 in) and weighs 4–15 kg (9–33 lb). Pelage colour ranges from silver grey to chocolate brown. Koalas from the northern populations are typically smaller and lighter in colour than their counterparts further south. These populations possibly are separate subspecies, but this is disputed.
Koalas typically inhabit open eucalypt woodlands, and the leaves of these trees make up most of their diet. Because this eucalypt diet has limited nutritional and caloric content, koalas are largely sedentary and sleep up to 20 hours a day. They are asocial animals, and bonding exists only between mothers and dependent offspring. Adult males communicate with loud bellows that intimidate rivals and attract mates. Males mark their presence with secretions from scent glands located on their chests. Being marsupials, koalas give birth to underdeveloped young that crawl into their mothers’ pouches, where they stay for the first six to seven months of their lives. These young koalas, known as joeys, are fully weaned around a year old. Koalas have few natural predators and parasites, but are threatened by various pathogens, such as Chlamydiaceae bacteria and the koala retrovirus, as well as by bushfires and droughtsDSCN1070DSCN1080DSCN1088DSCN1098DSCN1079DSCN1094DSCN1091

These photos were taken at a wild life sanctuary, in Perth Western Australia.

Watching The World Go By.

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This is my next door neighbours dog “MANA” he is a beautiful white boxer, with lovely blue eyes.  He loves to lie down and just watch the world go by from under the garage door.

 

The Little Corella, Having a Drink.

The little corella (Cacatua sanguinea), also known as the bare-eyed cockatoo, blood-stained cockatoo, short-billed corella, little cockatoo and blue-eyed cockatoo, is a white cockatoo native to Australia and southern New Guinea.[2] It was known as Birdirra among the Yindjibarndi people of the central and western Pilbara. They would keep them as pets, or traditionally cook and eat them. The downy DSCN0153DSCN0154feathers are used in traditional ceremonies and dances where they adorn head and armbands.

The can be very chatty (noisy) and gather in large groups ( hundreds at a time) they can also be quite the fool, hanging up side down from tree branches, squawking and flapping their wings. They really are one of Australia’s fun loving birds.

Cows & A Bull

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Some of these photos were taken whilst I was on holiday in the UK, ( I was using a different camera)  I was staying in a beautiful rural area named “Laverton” while taking glorious country walks I would come across these beautiful cow’s every day & they would come up to the fence to say hello. The bull was also very friendly & very noisy. I can’t help but see only sadness in these cows eyes.